Open Challenges

Our Open Challenges help kickstart ideas on how open data can be used to solve mobility problems. In this new, data-rich environment, Columbus, its residents, businesses, non-profits and visitors will be increasingly able to share, use and leverage previously unavailable or hard-to-find datasets to address complex problems, inspire innovation and improve quality of life in our community.

What could you build with the data featured in these open challenges? Could an app, map, dashboard or visualization fusing suggested datasets help inspire action, tell a story, inform a decision or help transform the mobility ecosystem of our smart

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DEVELOPERS NEEDED TO FILL AN "APP GAP"

We all praise the GPS apps that help us get around, but there is no current resource that tells drivers if the vehicle they’re operating is too tall for the upcoming bridge. As a truck, bus driver or fleet operator, this is pertinent information that is currently lacking while navigating our streets.

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CRASH DATA PUTS CITY IN THE KNOW FOR IMPROVED TRAFFIC SAFETY

In 2017, there were 1,094 fatal traffic crashes resulting in 1,179 traffic fatalities on Ohio roadways. We believe that data and technology can help reduce this number in the future. Today, professionals responsible for managing and improving the safety of our transportation system must often rely on dispersed and sometimes outdated or incomplete traffic information.

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TRACKING LOCAL FOOD SUPPLIES FOR HUNGRY FAMILIES

Each year, children, seniors and adults in Franklin County go hungry for about 70 million meals. Neighbors in our community struggle to access healthy food for a number of reasons, including lack of financial means as well as lack of access to transportation that can get them to food that meets their health or cultural needs.

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DATA PAVES THE WAY TO HELP OLDER ADULTS GET AROUND

Central Ohio's 65+ population is expected to double in the next 35 years – and the Baby Boomer generation is hardly slowing down. But as they age, many older adults may lack the ability or desire to drive and own a car. In a region characterized by suburban sprawl that also contains transit deserts, there's risk that many older adults could become socially isolated or cut off from critical services.

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HOW DOES WEATHER AFFECT COTA RIDERSHIP?

The Central Ohio Transit Authority is the region's public transportation leader, with nearly 19 million total rides in 2018 – a 3% increase from the previous year. With this increase, COTA Planners have worked to implement innovative solutions that will help them maintain their 91% customer satisfaction rate that won them Outstanding Public Transportation System among midsize agencies in 2018. While their real-time bus GPS data integration into the Smart Columbus Operating System has helped customers make mobility decisions, central Ohio’s severe winter weather presents another challenge. 

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HOW DOES WEATHER IMPACT PARKING USAGE?

Nearly 83% of Columbus residents drive alone in their car to and from work each day. With this high of a single occupancy vehicle rate, it can be imagined that parking is in high demand and use throughout the Columbus region. This community expects to welcome an additional 1 million residents by 2050 - if all of these people drive their own vehicle and mobility habits don’t change, developers will likely build more parking lots to match demand.

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What is the impact of construction activities on traffic incidents?

Construction is known as the 5th season here in central Ohio. With the Columbus region expected to add more than 1,000,000 people over the next 20 years, that probably won’t change anytime soon. More people in the region means building our facilities and infrastructure to accommodate for mobility and housing needs.

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What is the role of wind speed in wind turbine placements?

The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is the sole science agency for the Department of the Interior. As the Nation's largest water, earth, and biological science and civilian mapping agency, USGS collects, monitors, analyzes, and provides science about natural resource conditions, issues, and problems. Their diverse expertise enables them to carry out large-scale, multidisciplinary investigations and provide impartial scientific information to resource managers, planners, and other customers. They collect data about wind turbines including dimensions, locations, capacities, and active operation time frame.